Difference between revisions of "Buddhaghosa"

From Dhamma Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
m
 
Line 1: Line 1:
'''Buddhaghosa''', whose name means ‘The Buddha’s Voice’ was a  South-Indian  scholar-monk living in the 5th century CE who was invited to Sri Lanka by the prelates of the Mahàvihàra to write commentaries on the Tipiñaka. In doing so he also systemised and fixed the Theravàda interpretation of the Buddha’s teachings. He also wrote a guide to Theravàda doctrine called the [[Visuddhimagga]]. After literary labours Buddhaghosa returned to [[India]] and nothing is known of the rest of his life. His commentaries continue to be considered authoritative and are still widely read and studied today.  
+
[[Image:Buddhaghosa.jpg|thumb|300px|right]]
 +
 
 +
'''Buddhaghosa''', whose name means ‘The Buddha’s Voice’ was a  South-Indian  scholar-monk living in the 5th century CE who was invited to Sri Lanka by the prelates of the Mahàvihàra to write commentaries on the [[Tipitaka]]. In doing so he also systemised and fixed the Theravàda interpretation of the Buddha’s teachings. He also wrote a guide to Theravàda doctrine called the [[Visuddhimagga]]. After literary labours Buddhaghosa returned to [[India]] and nothing is known of the rest of his life. His commentaries continue to be considered authoritative and are still widely read and studied today.  
  
 
==References==
 
==References==

Latest revision as of 20:03, 24 October 2008

Buddhaghosa.jpg

Buddhaghosa, whose name means ‘The Buddha’s Voice’ was a South-Indian scholar-monk living in the 5th century CE who was invited to Sri Lanka by the prelates of the Mahàvihàra to write commentaries on the Tipitaka. In doing so he also systemised and fixed the Theravàda interpretation of the Buddha’s teachings. He also wrote a guide to Theravàda doctrine called the Visuddhimagga. After literary labours Buddhaghosa returned to India and nothing is known of the rest of his life. His commentaries continue to be considered authoritative and are still widely read and studied today.

References

  • Buddhism A to Z. Ven. Dhammika, 2007.